Logistics Solutions

Eliminate the labor-intensive tasks.

Let 1Cyber assemble, rack and cable your datacenter equipment — at your site or before it ships

With 1Cyber’s Rack and Stack Logistics Solutions, you’ll eliminate the labor-intensive tasks that must occur each and every time new a server cluster, storage device(s) or networking gear is installed.

Our experienced technicians can rack and cable your data center products — either on-site at your data center or prior to shipping at our facility, ensuring consistency and exceptionally high quality.

Save IT staff resources, maintain the focus on your core IT mission, and eliminate the unpredictability with our professional design and installation service.

With 1Cyber’s “Rack and Stack” service, you’ll eliminate the labor-intensive tasks that must occur each and every time new a server cluster, storage device(s) or networking gear is installed. Our experienced technicians can rack and cable your data center products — either on-site at your data center or prior to shipping at our facility, ensuring consistency and exceptionally high quality.

Our Logistics Solutions Features

  • Rack layout and design
  • Receive and unpack hardware
  • Inventory check and labelling
  • Professional assembly and mounting in racks
  • Power and network cables provisioning and installation
  • Intra-cabinet cabling as required
  • System updates, including firmware and BIOS upgrades
  • System imaging
  • Complete diagnostic and quality assurance inspections on all installed equipment
  • Full documentation, including serial number recording, cable list, layout and cable runs, Visio diagrams, and photo documentation

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What to Expect During a Traditional Rack-and-Stack Project?

It doesn’t make sense to have your L4 engineers stop work on a critical cloud migration and dedicate (over-qualified) time to rack-and-stack operations. You can’t afford to under-utilize your high-level full-time team for routine projects that could easily be handled by less expensive expertise.

With an engineering talent gap affecting teams globally, 90% of organizations are turning to contingent labor to get work done. If you haven’t worked with an outsourced field services provider before, here’s what to expect during an outsourced traditional rack-and-stack.

What Information Should You Share Before the Rack-and-Stack Project Begins?

Discovery Stage

Whether you are consolidating data centers or deploying all-new hardware, the service provider will need a detailed equipment list to scale qualified engineers to the task at hand. This will enable field service providers to give you an accurate quote and SoW for your project. From there, your potential provider will establish a schedule of when to act on the project and how it will assign engineers to each shift.

Delivery

The service provider will need to obtain the following details about the shipment as well as your facility (or facilities):

  • Is there a lift gate?
  • Is there floor protection?
  • Is there assembly and deployment space for the hardware as it arrives?
  • Will you require a Certificate of Insurance?

The service provider will need these details to determine the safest and most efficient method of delivering, unloading, and installing within your data center.

What Kind of Work (If Any) Do You Need to Do Ahead of Time to Prepare?

The in-house preparation burden depends on the specific hardware project you have going, whether you are working with a VAR for new equipment or receiving refurbished units from the secondary market.

New Data Center Equipment

For relatively straightforward data center rack and stacks with new hardware, your outsourced field services team will need rack elevation diagrams to determine where to install the incoming equipment. Each shipment box and pallet should be clearly labeled with its contents as well as its intended destination within your facility.

You should also consider who will be responsible for making sure that the proper cabling amenities are available on-site, whether it is your team or your field services provider.

What Happens on the Day of the Project?

A (quality) service provider will contact you prior to the project date and keep you updated on project details throughout the entire rack and stack process, typically through a project management portal. Through this portal, you should also be able to manage project steps, coordinate with your vendor, and make any changes

A timeline should have been included in the SoW as well, for preparation and accountability purposes. In addition to the service provider’s project managers, a member of your IT team will likely be invited to oversee the process to ensure that the hardware is installed to specifications.

You should also consider who will be responsible for making sure that the proper cabling amenities are available on-site, whether it is your team or your field services provider.

How Do You Verify that a Project is Complete?

Once the project reaches an end, your field services provider should deliver an on-site document that details:

  • Arrival time of engineers and equipment
  • Assets and Part numbers.
  • Personnel interactions.
  • Lists of (completed) tasks.
  • Photo evidence of tasks completion.
  • Diagram updates.
  • A customer survey (engineer ratings).

Quality 101 Point Inspection Checks Every Time?

  1. Equipment is carefully inspected for damages upon arriving at our warehouse. Each cover and component, including the chassis, is examined for dings, dents, scratches, and bends.
  2. Special attention is paid to delicate plastics that can be easily damaged from the weight of the chassis shifting during transport.
  3. Part numbers are verified and recorded.
  4. Model number is verified by machine configuration.
  5. Serial numbers(s) are recorded.
  6. Serial number(s) are verified as valid and maintainable with manufacturer.
  7. Part numbers are verified, and anything needed to bring the equipment up to present-day EC specifications is noted.
  8. External ports are inspected to assure proper retaining screws and latches are in place.
  9. Unused disk bays are noted to have appropriate fillers to maintain proper airflow.
  10. Completeness of equipment is noted, stating what is missing in order to acquire missing components prior to resale.
  11. Internal inspection is performed
  12. Any unusual smells are noted (such as component burn smell).
  13. Internal components inspected for oxidization and discolorations.
  14. Internal cleaning is performed.
  15. Reseating of components is performed to prevent invalid errors from occurring during the power-on self test.
  16. Proper placement of adapters is verified.
  17. Proper placement of memory is verified.
  18. Memory slots are inspected and verified to have all working insertion and extraction tolls in place.
  19. Memory slots are inspected and debris is removed or blown out.
  20. Adapter slots are inspected and debris is removed or blown out.
  21. Disk slots are emptied and blown out to remove debris.
  22. Empty adapter card and memory slots are inspected to contain filler panels to ensure proper air flow.
  23. CPUs are inspected to ensure they have proper type and amount of thermal protection paste.
  24. CPU fans are inspected for obstructions and cleanliness.
  25. CPU heatsink is inspected for proper type, alignment, and securing hardware.
  26. The mechanical aspects and covers and cover latches are tried and inspected for proper alignment and function.
  27. Cover sensors are inspected and tested for function.
  28. Cover grounding strips are inspected for cosmetic blemishes and function.
  29. Audible alarms and speakers are inspected and tested for function.
  30. Disk latches and clips are inspected for proper function.
  31. Disk bay grounding strips are inspected for proper function.
  32. DVD eject buttons, doors, and trays are inspected and tested for proper function.
  33. Proper disk removal and insertion are checked.
  34. The mechanical aspects of key locks are tried and inspected for proper function.
  35. Power button is inspected to assure proper function.
  36. Power-on self test is performed. Indicators and information are observed for proper sequencing and desired result.
  37. Power-on indicators are observed for proper sequencing and desired result.
  38. Self-test indicators are observed for proper sequencing and desired result.
  39. POST output is observed to confirm proper configuration.
  40. POST output is observed to discover errors.
  41. Disk drives and devices are observed for desired result.
  42. Testing is elevated (after successful completion of power-on self test) to the next level by implementing a full and complete diagnostic test.
  43. Power on/off switch/button is inspected during power-on self test.
  44. Power supplies are inspected during power-on self test.
  45. Power supply fans are inspected for function and obstructions.
  46. Fan assemblies are inspected during power-on self test.
  47. Indicator lights are inspected during power-on self test.
  48. Noise levels on fans are inspected during power-on self test.
  49. Noise levels on disks are inspected during power-on self test.
  50. Interface cards are inspected during power-on self test.
  51. Disks and disk indicator lights are inspected during power-on self test.
  52. CPUs are inspected during power-on self test.
  53. Memory is inspected during power-on self test.
  54. Motherboards are inspected during power-on self test.
  55. Non-working components are replaced or repaired.
  56. Firmware versions on motherboards are updated to compatible and current firmware and upgrade levels.
  57. Firmware versions on memory cards are updated to compatible and current firmware and upgrade levels.
  58. Firmware versions on disks are updated to compatible and current firmware and upgrade levels.
  59. Firmware versions on CPUs are updated to compatible and current firmware and upgrade levels.
  60. Firmware versions on interface cards are updated to compatible and current firmware and upgrade levels.
  61. Internal batteries are tested for proper voltage levels.
  62. Equipment is inventoried and stored, conforming to static shielding for electronic equipment.
  63. Equipment is stored, utilizing an identification and location bar-coded inventory system.
  64. Custom configurations are completed according to the proper specifications.
  65. Special attention is placed on compatibility of installed components, firmware levels, and software.
  66. Proper cabling for internally installed components is verified.
  67. Proper cables for externally attached devices are verified.
  68. Cables are inspected for attaching hardware.
  69. Proper termination requirements are checked on SCSI bus.
  70. A full diagnostic is performed on the final configuration.
  71. Proper power cord requirements are verified.
  72. Equipment racks are inspected for proper floor stabilizers (feet).
  73. Equipment racks are inspected for proper grounding equipment.
  74. Equipment rack casters are inspected for proper completeness and function.
  75. A second technician verifies all aspects of configuration and quality.
  76. Order is compared to final configuration.
  77. Bar codes are scanned for order and inventory accuracy.
  78. Equipment is re-checked for cosmetic issues.
  79. Any cosmetic issues are corrected.
  80. External surfaces are cleaned of glue, ink, dirt, etc.
  81. Packaging personnel verify the equipment against the order form.
  82. Packaging personnel verify the presence of rack mount kits and hardware.
  83. Desk side and desk top equipment is verified to have proper stand.
  84. Power cord presence and requirement is again verified.
  85. All items are packaged in static shielded environments.
  86. Custom reinforcement packaging products are placed around delicate areas of equipment to prevent damage.
  87. Accessories are separated within the packaging to prevent damage to/from the main unit.
  88. Special packaging is used to prevent movement and damage of the equipment within the box during transport.
  89. A minimum three-inch space for packaging material is required around the unit as it is places in the box.
  90. Reinforced fiber tape is used the secure the box closed.
  91. Heavily weighted equipment is boxed and strapped to a pallet.
  92. Corner boards are used to help protect equipment against shipping damage.
  93. Tip indicators are used to help identify mishandling during shipment.
  94. Shock indicators are used to help identify mishandles during shipment.
  95. Shrink wrap is used to help prevent water damage during shipment.
  96. Packing slip is placed in envelope and attached to package.
  97. Shipping address is verified.
  98. Air bill/Freight bill is attached to package(s).
  99. Tracking number is automatically sent to customer at e-mail address provided.
  100. Package is tracked electronically by tracking number, and delivery is verified and confirmed.
  101. Customer is called to verify receipt and complete satisfaction of ordered equipment.

Hyperscale Data Centers

 

The hyperscale data center is reshaping the global IT landscape, shifting data from on-premise to centralized data center hubs. As a result, data is flowing out of computer rooms and IT closets and into the world’s largest and most efficient data center facilities, which are designed to easily add more servers and power as they grow.

The rise of hyperscale computing has created a new paradigm in the data center business, changing the landscape for providers and customers alike. Hyperscale companies have become the largest customers for leasing wholesale and build-to-suit data center space. As a result, these customers hold huge sway over data center development, which has evolved rapidly to adapt to larger requirements.

Digital Pacific

AirTrunk

Macquarie Telecom

Vocus Communications

Global Switch

Equinix, Inc



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